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dc.creatorShiovitz Ezra, Sharon
dc.creatorShemesh, Jonathan
dc.creatorMcDonnell Naughton, Mary
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-28T21:27:02Z
dc.date.available2021-01-28T21:27:02Z
dc.date.created2018
dc.identifier.isbn978-3-319-73820-8
dc.identifier.otherhttps://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-3-319-73820-8_9
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12010/16943
dc.format.extent17 páginasspa
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfspa
dc.language.isoengspa
dc.publisherSpringer Naturespa
dc.subjectSalud física y mentalspa
dc.titleChapter 9 Pathways from Ageism to Lonelinessspa
dc.subject.lembSoledad – Aislamientospa
dc.subject.lembRechazo social -- Exclusión socialspa
dc.subject.lembDepresión -- Deterioro cognitivospa
dc.rights.accessrightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessspa
dc.rights.localAbierto (Texto Completo)spa
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-73820-8_9
dc.relation.referencesShiovitz-Ezra S., Shemesh J., McDonnell/Naughton M. (2018) Pathways from Ageism to Loneliness. In: Ayalon L., Tesch-Römer C. (eds) Contemporary Perspectives on Ageism. International Perspectives on Aging, vol 19. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-73820-8_9spa
dc.description.abstractenglishMany older adults in our society suffer from loneliness – a painful, distressing feeling arising from the perception that one’s social connections are inadequate. When loneliness is experienced over prolonged periods of time, it can become devastating to older adults’ physical and mental health. Loneliness has been associated with depression, cognitive decline, and mortality. As the ageing population around the world grows in size and proportion, tackling late life loneliness is becoming a top priority in both ethical and economic terms. Previous studies have attempted to attribute late life loneliness to individual (micro) and social network (meso)-level characteristics. We argue that ageism at the societal (macro)-level – encompassing stereotypes, prejudices, and de facto discrimination against older adults – predisposes the older population to neglect, social isolation, and ultimately, loneliness. We propose three mechanisms whereby ageism may contribute to loneliness. First, chronic social rejection may incline older adults to avoid and withdraw from social participation. Second, individuals may self-embody the stereotypes of old age such as old age being a time of loneliness. The last path is an objective one, which emphasizes age-based discriminatory practices that increase social exclusion of older adults thereby increasing their risk of becoming lonely.spa
dc.type.coarhttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_2f33spa
dc.rights.creativecommonshttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode


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