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dc.creatorAstier, Anne L.
dc.creatorHafler, David A.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-17T21:51:57Z
dc.date.available2020-11-17T21:51:57Z
dc.date.created2015
dc.identifier.isbn
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12010/15747
dc.format.extent117 páginasspa
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfspa
dc.language.isoengspa
dc.publisherFrontiers Media SAspa
dc.subjectMedicinespa
dc.titleT Cell Regulation by the Environmentspa
dc.subject.lembRegulación de las célulasspa
dc.subject.lembMetabolismospa
dc.subject.lembMicrobiomaspa
dc.rights.accessrightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessspa
dc.rights.localAbierto (Texto Completo)spa
dc.subject.keywordRegulatory T cellsspa
dc.identifier.doi
dc.relation.referencesAstier, A. L., Hafler, D. A., eds. (2015). T Cell Regulation by the Environment. Lausanne: Frontiers Media. doi: 10.3389/978-2-88919-733-0spa
dc.description.abstractenglishNaïve T cells get activated upon encounter with their cognate antigen and differentiate into a specific subset of effector cells. These T cells are themselves plastic and are able to re-differentiate into another subset, changing both phenotype and function. Differentiation into a specific subset depends on the nature of the antigen and of the environmental milieu. Notably, certain nutrients, such as vitamins A and D, sodium chloride, have been shown to modulate T cell responses and influence T cell differentiation. Parasite infection can also skew Th differentiation. Similarly, the gut microbiota regulates the development of immune responses. Lastly, the key role of metabolism on T cells has also been demonstrated. This series of articles highlights some of the multiple links existing between environmental factors and T cell responses.spa
dc.type.coarhttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_2f33spa


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