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dc.creatorCongdon, Tim
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-05T15:49:19Z
dc.date.available2020-11-05T15:49:19Z
dc.date.created2007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12010/15429
dc.description.abstractAfter the 1981 Budget, 364 university economists in Britain wrote to The Timesto complain about the tightness of macroeconomic policy, prompted by the plans in the Budget to cut public sector borrowing by some £3.3 billion, mainly by increasing taxes. It is now a commonplace view that the 364 were wrong to complain because, shortly after publication of the letter, the growth rate of real domestic demand and GDP switched from negative to positive. As it happens, this view is incorrect. As one of the 364, I would say that, wouldn’t I? So in what follows I pursue this question by analysing the periods before and after the sending of the letter. I conclude that the 364 economists were perfectly correct to complain about the macroeconomic policy of the day back in 1981.spa
dc.format.extent25 páginasspa
dc.format.mimetypetext/htmlspa
dc.language.isoengspa
dc.publisherElgarspa
dc.subjectExchangespa
dc.titleAn exchange 25 years later between Professor Stephen Nickell and Tim Congdonspa
dc.subject.lembEconomíaspa
dc.subject.lembEconomía -- Teoríasspa
dc.subject.lembDesarrollo económicospa
dc.rights.accessrightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessspa
dc.rights.localAbierto (Texto Completo)spa
dc.type.coarhttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_3248spa


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