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dc.creatorMedjeral-Thomas, Nicholas R.
dc.creatorThomson, Tina
dc.creatorAshby, Damien
dc.creatorMuthusamy, Anand
dc.creatorNevin, Margaret
dc.creatorDuncan, Neill
dc.creatorLoucaidou, Marina
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-22T15:23:13Z
dc.date.available2020-09-22T15:23:13Z
dc.date.created2020
dc.identifier.issn2468-0249spa
dc.identifier.otherhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.ekir.2020.08.022spa
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12010/13559
dc.description.abstractBackground: Dialysis patients are at risk of severe COVID-19. We managed COVID-19 haemodialysis outpatients in dedicated satellite dialysis units. This provided rare opportunity to study early disease progress in communitybased patients. We aimed to (1) understand COVID-19 progression, (2) identify markers of future clinical severity and (3) assess associations between dialysis management strategies and COVID-19 clinical outcomes. Methods: We conducted a cohort study of all outpatients managed at a COVID-19 haemodialysis unit. We analysed data recorded as part of providing COVID-19 clinical care. We analysed associations between features at diagnosis and the first 3 consecutive haemodialysis sessions in patients who required future hospital admission, and those who had died at 28 days. Results: Isolated outpatient haemodialysis was provided to 106 patients over 8 weeks. No patients received antiviral medication or hydroxychloroquine. 21 patients (20%) were admitted at COVID-19 diagnosis. 29 of 85 patients (34%) were admitted after initial outpatient management. 16 patients (15%) died. By multivariate analysis, non-active transplant list status, use of institutional transport, and increased white cell count associated with future hospitalisation and increased age associated with death. Oxygen saturations progressively decreased over the first 3 dialysis sessions in the cohorts who progressed to future hospital admission or death. Mean ultrafiltration volume of the first three haemodialysis sessions was reduced in the same cohorts. Conclusions: Outpatient haemodialysis in patients with COVID-19 is safe for patients and staff. Features at the first 3 dialysis sessions can identify individuals at risk of future hospitalisation and death from COVID-19.spa
dc.format.extent27 páginasspa
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfspa
dc.language.isoengspa
dc.publisherKidney International Reportsspa
dc.sourcereponame:Expeditio Repositorio Institucional UJTLspa
dc.sourceinstname:Universidad de Bogotá Jorge Tadeo Lozanospa
dc.subjectHaemodialysisspa
dc.subjectCoronavirusspa
dc.subjectSARS-CoV2spa
dc.subjectCOVID-19spa
dc.titleCohort study of outpatient hemodialysis management strategies for COVID-19 in North-West Londonspa
dc.type.localArtículospa
dc.subject.lembSíndrome respiratorio agudo gravespa
dc.subject.lembCOVID-19spa
dc.subject.lembSARS-CoV-2spa
dc.subject.lembCoronavirusspa
dc.rights.accessrightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessspa
dc.type.hasversioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/acceptedVersionspa
dc.rights.localAbierto (Texto Completo)spa
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.ekir.2020.08.022spa
dc.type.coarhttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_2df8fbb1spa


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