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dc.creatorLatinne, Alice
dc.creatorHu, Ben
dc.creatorOlival, Kevin J.
dc.creatorZhu, Guangjian
dc.creatorZhang, Libiao
dc.creatorLi, Hongying
dc.creatorChmura, Aleksei A.
dc.creatorField, Hume E.
dc.creatorZambrana-Torrelio, Carlos
dc.creatorEpstein, Jonathan H.
dc.creatorLi, Bei
dc.creatorZhang, Wei
dc.creatorWang, Lin-Fa
dc.creatorShi, Zheng-Li
dc.creatorDaszak, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-19T16:18:58Z
dc.date.available2020-09-19T16:18:58Z
dc.date.created2020-08-25
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723spa
dc.identifier.otherhttps://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-020-17687-3spa
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12010/13488
dc.format.extent15 páginasspa
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfspa
dc.language.isoengspa
dc.publisherNature Communicationsspa
dc.sourcereponame:Expeditio Repositorio Institucional UJTLspa
dc.sourceinstname:Universidad de Bogotá Jorge Tadeo Lozanospa
dc.subjectOrigin and transmission of bat coronavirusesspa
dc.subjectSevere Acute Respiratoryspa
dc.subjectRhinolophus spp batsspa
dc.subjectzoonotic diseasespa
dc.titleOrigin and cross-species transmission of bat coronaviruses in Chinaspa
dc.type.localArtículospa
dc.subject.lembSíndrome respiratorio agudo gravespa
dc.subject.lembCOVID-19spa
dc.subject.lembSARS-CoV-2spa
dc.subject.lembCoronavirusspa
dc.rights.accessrightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccessspa
dc.type.hasversioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/acceptedVersionspa
dc.rights.localAcceso restringidospa
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-17687-3spa
dc.description.abstractenglishBats are presumed reservoirs of diverse coronaviruses (CoVs) including progenitors of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)-CoV and SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of COVID-19. However, the evolution and diversification of these coronaviruses remains poorly understood. Here we use a Bayesian statistical framework and a large sequence data set from bat-CoVs (including 630 novel CoV sequences) in China to study their macroevolution, cross-species transmission and dispersal. We find that host-switching occurs more frequently and across more distantly related host taxa in alpha- than beta-CoVs, and is more highly constrained by phylogenetic distance for beta-CoVs. We show that inter-family and -genus switching is most common in Rhinolophidae and the genus Rhinolophus. Our analyses identify the host taxa and geographic regions that define hotspots of CoV evolutionary diversity in China that could help target bat-CoV discovery for proactive zoonotic disease surveillance. Finally, we present a phylogenetic analysis suggesting a likely origin for SARS-CoV-2 in Rhinolophus spp. batsspa
dc.type.coarhttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_6501spa


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