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dc.creatorLangford, Bradley J.
dc.creatorSo, Miranda
dc.creatorRaybardhan, Sumit
dc.creatorLeung, Valerie
dc.creatorWestwood, Duncan
dc.creatorMacFadden, Derek R.
dc.creatorSoucy, Jean Paul R.
dc.creatorDaneman, Nick
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-20T21:34:21Z
dc.date.available2020-08-20T21:34:21Z
dc.date.created2020-07-22
dc.identifier.issn1198-743Xspa
dc.identifier.otherhttps://www.clinicalmicrobiologyandinfection.com/article/S1198-743X(20)30423-7/fulltextspa
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12010/12045
dc.format.extent50 páginasspa
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfspa
dc.language.isoengspa
dc.publisherClinical Microbiology and Infectionspa
dc.sourcereponame:Expeditio Repositorio Institucional UJTLspa
dc.sourceinstname:Universidad de Bogotá Jorge Tadeo Lozanospa
dc.subjectInfecciones bacterianasspa
dc.titleBacterial co-infection and secondary infection in patients with COVID-19: a living rapid review and meta-analysisspa
dc.type.localArtículospa
dc.subject.lembSíndrome respiratorio agudo gravespa
dc.subject.lembCOVID-19spa
dc.subject.lembSARS-CoV-2spa
dc.subject.lembCoronavirusspa
dc.rights.accessrightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/embargoedAccessspa
dc.type.hasversioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/acceptedVersionspa
dc.rights.localAcceso restringidospa
dc.subject.keywordBacterial infectionsspa
dc.subject.keywordCo-infectionspa
dc.subject.keywordCOVID-19spa
dc.subject.keywordLiving reviewspa
dc.subject.keywordSecondary infectionspa
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmi.2020.07.016spa
dc.description.abstractenglishBackground Bacterial co-pathogens are commonly identified in viral respiratory infections and are important causes of morbidity and mortality. The prevalence of bacterial infection in patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 is not well understood. Aims To determine the prevalence of bacterial co-infection (at presentation) and secondary infection (after presentation) in patients with COVID-19. Sources We performed a systematic search of MEDLINE, OVID Epub and EMBASE databases for English language literature from 2019 to April 16, 2020. Studies were included if they (a) evaluated patients with confirmed COVID-19 and (b) reported the prevalence of acute bacterial infection. Content Data were extracted by a single reviewer and cross-checked by a second reviewer. The main outcome was the proportion of COVID-19 patients with an acute bacterial infection. Any bacteria detected from non-respiratory-tract or non-bloodstream sources were excluded. Of 1308 studies screened, 24 were eligible and included in the rapid review representing 3338 patients with COVID-19 evaluated for acute bacterial infection. In the meta-analysis, bacterial co-infection (estimated on presentation) was identified in 3.5% of patients (95%CI 0.4–6.7%) and secondary bacterial infection in 14.3% of patients (95%CI 9.6–18.9%). The overall proportion of COVID-19 patients with bacterial infection was 6.9% (95%CI 4.3–9.5%). Bacterial infection was more common in critically ill patients (8.1%, 95%CI 2.3–13.8%). The majority of patients with COVID-19 received antibiotics (71.9%, 95%CI 56.1 to 87.7%). Implications Bacterial co-infection is relatively infrequent in hospitalized patients with COVID-19. The majority of these patients may not require empirical antibacterial treatment.spa
dc.type.coarhttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_6501spa


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